Category Archives: way back

way back

The First Still

The First “STILL” — one of a series of photographs made at Edison’s little New York studio in the Chelsea district about 1901, to illustrate a German newspaper correspondent’s feature story about the “new American art.” The production appears to have been a comedy.

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beater projector

Thomas Armat‘s “beater” projector of 1895, the machine which established the essential principle, of a long period of rest and illumination in the intermittent film movement, on which all screen projection depends.

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the first fight picture

James J. Corbett and Peter Courtney, when they squared off before the Edison camera at West Orange in the first fight picture to reach the screen. 1894.

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“The Old Imp Company, pictured in the roaring days of the Independent war in the season of 1910-11.

1. Mary Pickford, 2. Owen Moore, 3. King Baggot, 4. Thomas Ince,
5. Jack Pickford, 6. Isabel Rae, 7. Lottie Pickford, 8. Joe Smiley,
9. William Shay, 10. Mrs. David Miles, 11. Joe MacDonald,
12. Hayward Mack, 13. Mrs. Joe MacDonald, 14. John Harvey,
15. George Loane Tucker, 16. David Miles, 17. Mrs. Pickford, 18. Robert Daley, 19. Tony Gaudio

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Carmencita

First Queen of the Movies, Carmencita, a music hall favorite, dancing for the Kinetoscope at West Orange in 1894.

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Florence Lawrence, ‘The Biograph Girl,’ the actress that Laemmle took for ‘Imp,’ in his first daring raid on the Patents Company‘s stellar talent.”

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Kinetoscope No 1

Kinetoscope No. 1, built by Edison in 1889, when the fifty-foot films ran on a spool bank, long before the reel was born.

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Michael Leonard

Latham Relics — above — Michael Leonard, who posed for the first screen fight made for Latham‘s special edition of Edison’s Kinetoscope — below — one of Latham’s Panoptikon’s first projectors — bottom — Latham Eidoloscope film of 1895, extract size.

Latham's Special Edition

1895

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Carmencita

Carmencita, First “Vamp” of the motion picture, a music hall favorite of the Naughty-Nineties, in the most daring pose that the press agent for Koster & Bial’s could imagine then.

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Mabel Normand, with John Bunny, at left, and Jimmy Morrison, in one of her first screen appearances, “Trouble and Secretary” at Vitagraph — after that came Biograph, Keystone, Sennett and fame.”